What to do with traffic problems

A long time ago, humanity lived from agriculture, making them stay in the country, but nowadays people have migrated to cities, making them bigger; consequently, workers and students have to travel big distances. The way of transport has also changed, from horses to cars, buses and trains, being successful for many years. However, due to the rise of population, many problems have developed, affecting the transport in the big cities, especially the volume of traffic and public transport. Therefore, steps to resolve these issues are about improving what is already built and managing new ideas on the part of governments and of everybody.

. The way of transport has also changed, from horses to cars, buses and trains, being successful for many years. However, due to the rise of population, many problems have developed, affecting the transport in the big cities, especially the volume of traffic and public transport. Therefore, steps to resolve these issues are about improving what is already built and managing new ideas on the part of governments and of everybody.
The main transport difficulties that people in big cities have to face these days are related to stressful traffic and inadequate public locomotion, as a result of the bad planning system. Craig (2010) says that the quick rise of the traffic overcrowding in Brisbane has people very worried. Also, the public transport in many cities, like Brisbane, doesn’t have the status that it should, as David White, the Community Action for Sustainable Transport president, declared (Helbig, 2009). Litman (2006) suggests that the planning of the transport system has a wrong design because it works with agencies for individual aspects, therefore there is not cohesion for a great plan, and other people suggest that the infrastructure is “not keeping up with growth” (Helbig, 2009).   

To fix these problems, the steps to take are not only trying to recover what has been done, but also sharing new ideas that everybody can do. Arrangements to improve are, for example, repairing streets that usually have too much congestion (Helbig, 2009), or raising the percentage of people traveling by public transport, bringing more buses, as Brisbane’s authorities want to do (Royes, 2009). Other solutions are like “Win-Win Solutions”, innovations that help “[to correct] existing market distortions that result in economically excessive vehicle travel” (Litman, 2006). Examples are the “Commute Trip Reduction” (giving flexible schedules in works and improving cycling services, looking to decrease the number of car trips), or “Smart Growth Land Use Policies” that try to have smaller neighborhoods with more services to make them walkable (Litman, 2006).   

In addition, to show that the transportation problems can be resolved, successful systems imposed will be related. First, Bogotá, a city that was messy, polluted and slow because of the traffic (Candiracci, 2006). In 2001 the government supported cycling and walking, limited the use of cars, and implemented an expedited system of buses for public transport as part of a “comprehensive urban mobility strategy” (Candiracci, 2006). It has lines exclusively for public transportation and GPS control among others, resulting in a better standard of living (Candiracci, 2006). Other examples have been imposed in developed countries, where governments ask a tax for private cars in the city; or in others, they have closed some streets, making them just for walking (Royes, 2009).

In conclusion, many crowed cities have problems with the traffic and public transport system, moreover with the drawbacks that these problems bring to the society. The main solutions are related to the improvement of what has been done, like the upgrading of streets in addition to the upgrading of the public transport. Although it is also essential that the planning of the cities should be conform to the future and that everybody can participate, as the Win-Win solutions proposes. It is possible to fix those problems, because they have been repaired in cities as Bogotá.  

References

Candiracci, S. (2006). Learning from Bogota's bus transport system. (R. Rollnick, Ed.) Habitat Debate , 12 (1), 18.

Craig, J. (2010, April). Brisbane's Transport Monster. Retrieved May 12, 2010, from Centre for Policy and Development Systems: http://cpds.apana.org.au/Documents/Crisis_in_GQ/Articles/Transport_Monster.htm

Helbig, K. (2009, November 26). Road congestion main problem for Brisbane. Retrieved May 17, 2010, from Northside Chronicle: http://northside-chronicle.whereilive.com.au/news/story/road-congestion-main-problem-for-brisbane/

Litman, T. (2006). Tackling traffic jams - win-win transportation solutions. (R. Rollnick, Ed.) Habitat Debate , 12 (1), 15.

Royes, L. (2009, November 19). Are our driving days numbered? City News , pp. 24-25.

 

 

UNETE
Compartir
Tu nombre:

E-mail amigo:
Enviar
PDF




  • linkedin facebook twitter
  • ©reeditor.com
  • Todos los derechos reservados
  • Avisos Legales